Picture
I would like everyone to know the reason I titled this blog Paint-a-thon was due to the fact that this guy got painted in two days! Yes, I did not get much sleep, but it was worth the challenge this model presented. It was a pretty large scale miniature with gigantic wings on a 50mm square base.

I complied the pictures I took with my phone over the course of the whole painting process from black primer to what you see on the left, the finished mini. I also took some detailed pictures of my NMM gold work I did on the armor. All the paints I use for this figure are Reaper Master Series paints. 

Picture
Used Templar Blue for the base coat.
Picture
Grass Green as a base coat for the wings.
Picture
I'm using Midnight Blue to make darker shadows and Sapphire Blue, True Blue, and finally Sky Blue to work to a highlight.
Picture
I move around the mini, I find this lets the paint dry in one area while I work on another. No annoying halos to contend with. To make the arrows on his chest glow I used a Sun Yellow highlighted up to Pure white. To make the diffused glow on his skin I watered down and brushed over the blue with the yellow. Also painted the armor my first color of NMM gold, mahogany brown.
Picture
For the shadow in the wings I used a Forest Green. I used two coats of this to get a good dark color. I highlighted up with a Pale Green to Sun Yellow.
Picture
A little more highlighting on the blue along with painting the horns a Stone Gray. I used Stone Gray for his toe nails and other assorted claws.
Picture
Here's where I get to work on the armor. I already have my darkest color for my shadows, Mahogany Brown down, I then paint over it with a Chestnut Gold everywhere the light will hit, excluding folds and bends in the armor. I find that looking at statues cast in gold or even gold painted by the masters in paintings really helps get a better understanding of light on metal.
Picture
More Chestnut Gold covering the whole thing, this is the second application. I thin my paints down so they blend well with the other colors.
Picture
Next step is Amber Gold covering a smaller surface area on top of the Chestnut Gold.
Picture
A nice application of Sun Yellow to make it more golden in color. I promise we're getting closer to the end result. By this point I'm convinced it's gold armor.
Picture
Almost finished, just take some Pure White and add it to the very edges of your metal on raised surfaces as the highest highlights.
Picture
Here's the end result on the armor, I move on to the weapons, which I painted with a Regal Purple.
Picture
The finished axe painted with Monarch purple, shadowed with Regal Purple. The highlights I brought up with a Amethyst Purple with a touch of yellow. I really dig the purple and yellow combo.
Picture
Same color combo on the sword.
I hope you guys like my quick run through of the painting process. Sorry if the quality isn't the greatest, I take quick snapshots with my Iphone. Please feel free to ask me any questions.
Miniature is Daemon Prince by Games Workshop
Painted by Miniature Mistress
 
 
Picture
    Where to begin? Well, I guess I'll start with the basics. I'd like to say I'm painting at an intermediate level, but I did start off somewhere, at a game table to be specific. I play Dungeon's and Dragons on a somewhat regular basis and like most groups, we play with those little people, the miniatures. I quickly decided I needed my own and went in search of the perfect miniature to represent my miniature. I ended up with a female cleric from Reaper.

    At this point I hadn't ever seen a painted miniature, I  just knew that they could be painted with a paint brush and some paint. That would make them look pretty, right? I poked around in my dad's old model car kits and found some paint. Ah! At last, I could paint my little cleric. I set to work, but the paint was shiney and thick, but it still looked pretty!? I had the colors, now she was ready for the table.
    I brought her to game night, proud of what I had accomplished. My DM picked her up and looked at her and asked "You want to paint these, they have special paint for them." What? I had no idea, where could I find such wonderful stuff to make the precious... I mean pretty. 
    I directed to Reaper's paints and their learn to paint kits, which are very helpful. I purchased Reaper's Learn to Paint Kit 2: Skin and Cloth.
    I quickly set to work on painting the female miniature in the kit, she was a good replacment for my original cleric full of car paint. With brush in hand, I set out, priming, painting base coats, and struggling to make those eyes look real. I watched my miniature slowly come to life and it was magical.
Picture
Rough around the edges, but I still don't think it was bad for my first fully painted miniature.
    To this day, three years later, I am still playing Dungeons and Dragons with that figure, even though my painting skills have improved greatly.